Gordini Da Goose GTX Glove Review

Gordini Da Goose GTX Gloves are heavily insulated, single-layer gloves suitable for winter hiking or skiing, specially made for people who get cold hands. They’re insulated with goose down and synthetic insulation with a warm fleece liner and a zippered pocket on the pack of the hand that can hold a heat pack. They also provide enough dexterity so that you can wear them and hold an ice axe in the ready position, which is a surprisingly difficult capability to achieve on heavily insulated gloves.

Specs at a Glance

  • Type: Single layer
  • Waterproof/Breathable Insert: Yes (Gore-Tex Plus Warm)
  • Insulation: 600-fill Goose Down insulation on the back of the hand, synthetic insulation in the palm, and high loft fleece in the gauntlet
  • Palm: Goatskin
  • Exterior: Polyester with softshell trim
  • Wrist Gauntlets: Yes
  • Leash: Yes
  • Nose Wipe: Yes
  • Weight: 9.8/pair in a size XL
  • Gender: Unisex

As a winter hiker, I like carrying one pair of warm waterproof insulated gloves that have enough dexterity that I can use them with tools, like an ice axe, on more challenging winter hikes and mountain ascents. I’ve found it relatively difficult to find gloves that match this requirement since manufacturers design gear for skiers and ice climbers, who have very different and often incompatible requirements than winter hikers. In addition, most glove manufacturers change their product line every year or two so it’s never a guarantee that you can buy a second pair when you find one that you like…which is why I’m always on the lookout for gloves that fit the bill.

The Gordini Da Goose GTX Gloves have goatskin palms and fingers that provide good dexterity for such a heavily insulated glove.
The Gordini Da Goose GTX Gloves have goatskin palms and fingers that provide good dexterity for such a heavily insulated glove.

These Gordini Da Goose GTX Gloves passed my “ice axe dexterity test” without any issues and they’re quite well insulated with all of the features you’d want on a winter hiking/mountaineering glove. The backs of the hands are insulated with 600 fill power goose down and the palms with synthetic insulation which is more insulating than down when it’s compressed. They have insulated gauntlets to keep your wrists covered and warm at the sleeve ends of a hard shell or insulated jacket, they come with very comfortable wrist leashes to prevent your gloves from flying away in the wind and there’s a zippered pocket on the back of the hand to hold a heat pack if suffer from cold hands or Raynaud’s disease.

The gloves have a waterproof/breathable Gore-tex insert and a soft fleecy lining which is comfortable and luxurious to wear, although the liner is not attached to the exterior glove and can slip a bit when you take out your hands. While the gloves do have a waterproof insert, the polyester, softshell, and suede areas on the exterior absorb water and can make the interior feel cooler.

The Da Goose GTX Gloves have a zippered back pocket to hold a heat pad, fleece lined gauntlets, and comfortable wrist leashes.
The Da Goose GTX Gloves have a zippered back pocket to hold a heat pad, fleece lined gauntlets, and comfortable wrist leashes.

Assessment

I wish I could say the Gordini’s Da Goose GTX Gloves were a good fit for my needs, but they’re more of a near miss. While they provide the dexterity I need for tool use and they are very warm, the fit is really quite tight, even in a size XL, which probably makes them colder because they trap less warm air. I normally wear somewhere between a Medium and a Large size glove, but that would be unthinkable in this model. If you decided they’re worth a try, be sure to size up at least one size. Unfortunately, XL is the largest size they offer.

Disclosure: The author received a pair of gloves for this review.

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Last updated: 2022-05-03 05:11:37

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